Tags: baking, bathroom, clogged, cut, drain, drugs, growth, health, medications, mold, myself-tetanus, pured, rinsed, shot, sink, soda, stopper, vaccinations, vinegar

Cut myself-tetanus shot??

On Health & Drugs & Medications » Vaccinations

30,607 words with 35 Comments; publish: Fri, 14 Dec 2007 05:07:00 GMT; (900140.63, « »)

My bathroom sink drain is clogged up with mold growth so I took out the stopper and pured some baking soda and vinegar down it. Then I rinsed it with water and stuck my finger down there to grab out some cluimps of mold and hair and ACK, I sliced my finger! The cut doesn't seem too bad. Bled a lot and its underneath my cuticle/nail. I haven't had a tetanus shot for a long time. I want to say during my teenage years, so likely at least 10 years have passed. What to do? I've cut myself before on clean kitchen knives and such without a second thought, but a moldy drain? Help!

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  • 35 Comments
    • If it bled, I wouldn't worry about it. Tetanus can only thrive in an anaerobic (no oxygen) environment, and blood contains oxygen. :)

      Besides, a tetanus vaccine would do you absolutely no good now (from what I understand it takes about three weeks to develop antibodies from it). If you actually did have a wound in which there might be tetanus then you would want to get the tetanus immunoglobulin.

      #1; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:20:00 GMT
    • No worries of tetanus at all.

      -Angela

      #2; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:21:00 GMT
    • Nadda worry for tetanus or the tetanus shot. A tetanus shot would be silly right now...would not be effective for this wound anyway...especially if your last booster was 10+ years ago.

      As long as it bled pretty good, got cleaned really well and is healing...I would say just fine! I bet it hurt though!

      #3; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:22:00 GMT
    • Okay, my husband said the same thing about the blood (and it bled a LOT) so I feel pretty secure now. Every time I see a doctor they try and get me to take the booster and I always decline. If I WAS to get tetanus, could I pass it to my toddler through breastmilk? What about the booster--is it safe to get it while breastfeeding?
      #4; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:23:00 GMT
    • Most tetanus vaccines have a full dose of mercury. I would not be comfortable getting it while nursing.

      -Angela

      #5; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:24:00 GMT
    • As to whether tetanus passes through breastmilk, I would venture a guess that tetanus is so incredibly rare that no one has a really good idea.

      -Angela

      #6; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:25:00 GMT
    • MamasBoys, The wound you received will most likely not be an exposure to tetanus. I would however like to clear up some misconceptions (yet again) about tetanus. Tetanus spores require an anaerobic environment to germinate into the vegetative state which is the metabolic state that produces the toxin. Unless you are planning on keeping the wound bleeding, at some point the environment will become anaerobic which is why it is important to thoroughly irrigate and cleanse a wound and keep it clean.

      If someone has received the full tetanus series then a booster will provide an amnestic or protective response within 10 days. While this wound is not a likely candidate for tetanus infection, subsequent exposure is a concern which is why a booster is often administered. The incubation for tetanus averages 7-13 days. To review, while a wound that has bled reduces the likelihood for tetanus infection, it is not a guarantee.

      SM

      #7; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:26:00 GMT
    • If I WAS to get tetanus, could I pass it to my toddler through breastmilk? What about the booster--is it safe to get it while breastfeeding?

      By the time you had enough tetanus toxin in your system to where it could (in theory, if it even works like that, which is probably unknown) be passed on in bm, bf'ing would be the LAST thing on your mind.

      #8; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:27:00 GMT
    • Unless you are planning on keeping the wound bleeding, at some point the environment will become anaerobic which is why it is important to thoroughly irrigate and cleanse a wound and keep it clean.

      Bolding mine, because I don't agree with the way you've stated that as though ALL wounds eventually become devoid of oxygen.

      I agree with most of what you said, but can you please provide me some information on this statement? I've never before heard that all wounds eventually become lacking in oxygen, which is what you just stated. In fact, microcirculation to wounded tissue is considered essential for the healing process. Microcirculation brings blood, which brings oxygen... How else would the cells that are repairing the wound get the nutrients and oxygen they need to do the work of repairing the injury? They don't function in a vacuum.

      But yes, I agree that seeing blood one time doesn't mean the wound will never become anaerobic - just that it isn't at the time it's bleeding.

      #9; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:28:00 GMT
    • Well I'm not dead, so everything worked out okay. But now I'm wondering if its better for me to get a booster as soon as my son weans and before I get pregnant with the next, since I certainly don't want to have to get one while I'm breastfeeding.
      #10; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:29:00 GMT
    • You don't have to get one ever. It's your choice.
      #11; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:30:00 GMT
    • Why would you need a tetanus vax? Tetanus has ALWAYS been incredibly rare. AND they don't even know if the vax works- the CDC admits they "assume" it works.

      -Angela

      #12; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:31:00 GMT
    • Why would you need a tetanus vax? Tetanus has ALWAYS been incredibly rare. AND they don't even know if the vax works- the CDC admits they "assume" it works.

      -Angela

      So if you stepped on a rusty nail you wouldn't get a tetanus shot? You'd just hope you weren't a rare case?

      I always planned (with myself and with my children) that if there was an injury, we'd get the shot THEN. Now that I've had this incident, it makes me wonder if I should go ahead and get a booster between the time that I am breastfeeding and pregnant, since I would especially like to spare my children the mercury.

      Why are people in this forum always so defensive and rude?

      #13; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:32:00 GMT
    • So if you stepped on a rusty nail you wouldn't get a tetanus shot? You'd just hope you weren't a rare case?

      I always planned (with myself and with my children) that if there was an injury, we'd get the shot THEN. Now that I've had this incident, it makes me wonder if I should go ahead and get a booster between the time that I am breastfeeding and pregnant, since I would especially like to spare my children the mercury.

      Why are people in this forum always so defensive and rude?

      I was neither defensive or rude- sorry you felt I was.

      No. I would not get a tetanus shot if I stepped on a rusty nail. From what I've read I have no confidence in the tetanus vaccine working at all.

      Add to that I am allergic/reactive to the vaccine. I would not get it for myself, or allow it for my children under any circumstances.

      The ped who finally had the sense to stop giving it to me warned I should never have it again. If I risked it, it should be given in an ER with the equipment on hand to plan for me to crash and go into anaphylactic shock.

      Tetanus is incredibly rare. Always has been. It's a risk in the elderly and those with poor circulation (diabetics) It's a risk in crushing trauma injuries like car wrecks.

      -Angela

      #14; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:33:00 GMT
    • I always planned (with myself and with my children) that if there was an injury, we'd get the shot THEN. Now that I've had this incident, it makes me wonder if I should go ahead and get a booster between the time that I am breastfeeding and pregnant, since I would especially like to spare my children the mercury.

      I'm not sure of your children's vaccination status, but if they are unvaccinated, you cannot give them the shot after an injury and expect it to protect them. That strategy only works in people who have already had a primary series - or at least the first two doses. If one dose was enough to prevent tetanus, then they wouldn't give three. So one dose after an injury will not help your children. If you are really concerned about tetanus (a fear I understand) then you would need to give them at least two doses now, in preparation for a possible injury in the future. Otherwise, your choice will be to give them the tetanus immune globulin, which is a blood product that would provide protection for about 3 weeks, or to do nothing.

      Also, you can get a mercury-free tetanus shot for yourself. Then your only concern as far as neurotoxins go would be the aluminum.

      I really don't think anyone was rude to you. If you want the vax, get the vax. Just don't assume that everyone in the world would do the exact same thing you're doing. That's a false assumption. Most of the regulars in this forum do NOT get tetanus boosters or post-injury boosters. We were letting you know that you don't have to get it if you don't want to. That's it. There's certainly nothing rude or defensive about letting a person know that she has a choice about something. Get it if you want to, when you want to. Do what makes you happy. Telling you that you have a choice and we believe it's yours to make is a heck of a lot nicer than telling you that you have to get the vaccine, which is what most people outside of MDC will do.

      #15; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:34:00 GMT
    • Purely anecdotal but I've jumped on two rusty nails simultaneously by accident in an unvaccinated state. They were in a board together sticking up on the floor of an old derelict house. I wasn't looking & had jandals on. It hurt like hell as the nails went right into my foot. It hardly bled. I knew nothing about sodium ascorbate in those days so I went & stuck my foot in the sea until it felt less painful & that was it. No sign of tetanus at all. I very much lived to tell the tale.
      #16; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:36:00 GMT
    • What's weird is that, if I stepped on a rusty nail, I wouldn't give tetanus a second thought, and I haven't had a booster since I was 6. The chances that I'll get tetanus are much smaller than the chances that I'll get some weirdo gangrene infection and end up with an amputated limb.

      Tetanus is just not on my radar of things I worry myself over when it comes to my own health.

      But when it comes to my kid, one in 50 million odds seems too close for comfort suddenly. Go figure.

      #17; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:37:00 GMT
    • If you're worried, yes, you should definitely go get the booster between bfing and another pregnancy.

      Saying "oh I'm not worried" is all well and good until you're the one who has it...

      But this wound should be fine -- you really only need to worry about puncture wounds where air can't get to the inside.

      #18; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:37:00 GMT
    • Bolding mine, because I don't agree with the way you've stated that as though ALL wounds eventually become devoid of oxygen.

      I agree with most of what you said, but can you please provide me some information on this statement? I've never before heard that all wounds eventually become lacking in oxygen, which is what you just stated. In fact, microcirculation to wounded tissue is considered essential for the healing process. Microcirculation brings blood, which brings oxygen... How else would the cells that are repairing the wound get the nutrients and oxygen they need to do the work of repairing the injury? They don't function in a vacuum.

      But yes, I agree that seeing blood one time doesn't mean the wound will never become anaerobic - just that it isn't at the time it's bleeding.Plummeting, I can see how my statement could cause some confusion. Tetanus is an obligate anaerobe so can neither germinate in the presence of oxygen nor requires it for germination and subsequent toxin production. However, what you described is accurate but the presence of sufficient quantities of oxygen to keep C. tetani from germinating are not necessarily present. In fact, once toxin is produced, it is taken up by the proximal vascular circulation and lymphatics that you described.

      The management of tetanus 1996.Source: Tropical doctor [0049-4755] Sanders yr:1996 vol:26 iss:3 pg:107 -15

      I also include this link which is a case report of a pediatric tetanus infection in an unvaccinated child. I am not doing so to fear-monger, I think it is important to understand the disease, the symptomology and treatment involved since there are always so many questions about tetanus and the dismissal of its severity.

      http://www.pedsccm.org/RARE/Tetanus.html

      SM

      #19; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:39:00 GMT
    • I am not doing so to fear-monger, I think it is important to understand the disease, the symptomology and treatment involved since there are always so many questions about tetanus and the dismissal of its severity.

      http://www.pedsccm.org/RARE/Tetanus.html

      SM

      Oddly, I've never seen anyone dismiss the severity of tetanus. Just the likelihood of getting it, which is something else, altogether.

      We all know that tetanus is a very nasty disease which can be fatal. But thanks for the info.

      #20; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:39:00 GMT
    • Here:

      Unless you are planning on keeping the wound bleeding, at some point the environment will become anaerobic which is why it is important to thoroughly irrigate and cleanse a wound and keep it clean.

      #21; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:47:00 GMT
    • Yeah, that's it. :)
      #22; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:48:00 GMT
    • I'm xposting my response to another tetanus question, as well as the link to that thread cuz i think it's relevant.

      http://www.nfid.org/pdf/factsheets/tetanusadult.pdf is a website that the nih.gov links to about tetanus.

      "Approximately 16% of reported cases of Tetanus are fatal." It also states that there are 50 or fewer reported cases of Tetanus in the US per year.

      This is from "Natural Baby and Childcare" by Lauren Feder, M.D.

      "Home Treatment: Clean the wound with soap, hot water, and Calendula officinalis. According to an article from the Journal of the American Mediacal Assosciation, "Good wound care is probably the single most important factor in the prevention of tetanus in fresh wounds." "

      I've never heard about air killing tetanus, but it's a bacteria, so any wound care that kills bacteria (lest its a deep puncture would) should work to protect against tetanus.

      The othe post about tetanus is http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=696162 and it's got good info. Tetanus is usually only really an issue in deep puncture wounds and crushing wounds (like a car accident or something very heavy falling on you) and after exposure, only a tetanus immunoglobin shot would be very effective in helping to fight it. the vaccine would not.

      TG

      #23; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:49:00 GMT
    • MamasBoys, The wound you received will most likely not be an exposure to tetanus. Unless you are planning on keeping the wound bleeding, at some point the environment will become anaerobic which is why it is important to thoroughly irrigate and cleanse a wound and keep it clean.

      SM My statement

      What's in question here is your statement that all wounds will eventually become anaerobic enough to be hospitable to tetanus. To this ??

      MK and Plummeting, editing may not be up your alley.

      SM

      #24; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:50:00 GMT
    • Yikes! I wonder what % of the cases of pediatric tetanus have stuff like this going on?

      From the case report:

      After receiving another 2500 units of tetanus antiglobulin, he was taken to the operating room where, during wound debridement, a 6 cm long section of fish bone was removed and bone biopsy showed evidence of necrosis and osteomyelitis.

      He had a 6 cm long fish bone in a necrotising wound for more than 5 days?

      #25; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:41:00 GMT
    • With regard to the link posted ~ I would wonder if proper medical treatment measures had been taken (i.e. getting the bone out immediately and irrigating the wound) ~ would tetanus have been involved? I would venture to guess, probably not.

      My frustration with vaccines is that they take away the need to be educated on these diseases and how to prevent them (i.e. in this case proper wound management) as even the vaccinated are at risk of contracting tetanus. I think everyone on these threads regarding tetanus always says ~ clean the wound well.

      The tetanus shot is not all that effective...in fact effectiveness is not truly known that I have found...it is guessed at.

      #26; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:42:00 GMT
    • The tetanus shot is not all that effective...in fact effectiveness is not truly known that I have found...it is guessed at.

      Right. They "assume" it works quite well...

      How on earth do you tell how something works against something so rare? I "assume" that dancing naked in the moonlight prevents being hit by meteorites.

      I haven't had one hit anywhere near me since I've been dancing naked in the moonlight.

      :wink

      -Angela

      #27; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:43:00 GMT
    • Right. They "assume" it works quite well...

      How on earth do you tell how something works against something so rare? I "assume" that dancing naked in the moonlight prevents being hit by meteorites.

      I haven't had one hit anywhere near me since I've been dancing naked in the moonlight.

      :wink

      -Angela

      Hmmm! Can I come watch? No meteorites and a naked lady dancing in the moonlight! What fun...:lol

      #28; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:44:00 GMT
    • Plummeting, I can see how my statement could cause some confusion. Tetanus is an obligate anaerobe so can neither germinate in the presence of oxygen nor requires it for germination and subsequent toxin production. However, what you described is accurate but the presence of sufficient quantities of oxygen to keep C. tetani from germinating are not necessarily present. In fact, once toxin is produced, it is taken up by the proximal vascular circulation and lymphatics that you described.

      I understand how the toxin is taken up. That's not in question here. What's in question here is your statement that all wounds will eventually become anaerobic enough to be hospitable to tetanus. Can you please provide some evidence to support that? Repeating yourself is not evidence. If all wounds do become sufficiently anaerobic to allow the germination of the bacteria, then why was tetanus so rare before the introduction of the vaccine, despite the fact that it is ubiquitous? Please provide some evidence, somewhere, from someone that shows me that all wounds eventually become so oxygen depleted that they are the right environment for tetanus. Without such, I can't believe it based solely on your word.

      Or wait, are you now changing your stance? Before you said a wound "will" become anaerobic. Now you're saying "sufficient quantities of oxygen...are not necessarily present." Generally when someone uses the word "necessarily" they mean, "maybe, maybe not". So are you now changing your position to mean that MAYBE a wound will become anaerobic?

      #29; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:45:00 GMT
    • What's in question here is your statement that all wounds will eventually become anaerobic enough to be hospitable to tetanus.Plummeting, where did I make this statement?

      SM

      #30; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:46:00 GMT
    • SM, so you don't believe that all wounds eventually become anaerobic, but you have the medical intuitiveness to determine that the OP's wound WILL become anaerobic? Could you please explain how it is that you determined that the OP's wound WILL become anaerobic, unless she continues to keep it bleeding for the rest of her life?

      Since I assumed you did not believe you were a medical intuitive or some other form of psychic and that you were not in possession of any special knowledge of the OP's physical health that would suggest she is especially prone to circulatory problems, when you made the statement that her wound WILL become anaerobic if allowed to heal, I assumed quite reasonably that this is your stance on all wounds. Where did I go wrong here? Are you of the position that you are a medical intuitive? OR do you have special knowledge of the OP's health that would allow you to determine that she is especially likely to experience a circulatory problem? If it is the former, you're going to have to excuse me for not accepting that explanation. If it is the latter, I still need to hear how it is that you've determined that this wound, among all wounds that are received by people with the mystery condition afflicting the OP, will be the one that "will" (in your words) become anaerobic.

      Barring any mystical powers of medical discernment or the possession of any information unknown to the rest of us, you have no basis on which to make the claim that this wound will become anaerobic if it is ever allowed to stop bleeding and experience the state known as healing. I happen to know you aren't in possession of any special information and I happen to suspect you are not claiming to be a psychic. Therefore, I did not believe you thought you had special knowledge of this particular situation that would allow you to make claims about how this particular wound would heal. Because of that, I made the very reasonable assumption that you were expressing your personal view on the wound healing process in general. Why else on earth would you make the statement, since you certainly aren't qualified to tell any stranger online how her injury is or is not going to heal??

      I understand, though. Your claim is that you were never making any blanket statement about wounds in general. Your claim is that you possess special knowledge of the OP's wound and her health status, that allowed you to determine that HER wound WILL become anaerobic. Is that correct? What is the source of this special knowledge and can you provide me references to support your assertion? If it is true that there are certain types of wounds in healthy adults that WILL become anaerobic every time, I feel that this is information you should share. Even the most rabid pro-vaccination information I've ever seen doesn't state that - only that some wounds are more likely to become anaerobic (not that they will) and that some medical conditions predispose people to tetanus, since their wounds are more likely to become anaerobic (not that all of them do).

      To review, the OP's condition is a cut under the cuticle, which she sustained while reaching into her clogged drain. In the OP's exact words, "it bled a LOT". What about this situation tells you that the wound WILL become anaerobic? This is information all of us should have, in order to be sure we are making a fully informed decision.

      #31; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:51:00 GMT
    • I sliced my finger! The cut doesn't seem too bad. Bled a lot and its underneath my cuticle/nail.Plummeting, I was beginning to think that you had decided to abandon your passive/aggressive Modus operandi but even I can be wrong. Here is the relevant excerpt from the original poster, not a scrape nor a scratch and underneath the nail. Here is a helpful reference (there is probably a newer edition available):

      Mechanisms of Microbial Disease. 1998. 3rd edition. eds. Schaechter, M., Engleberg, N.C., Eisenstein, B.I. and Medoff, G. Williams and Wilkins publishers.

      No psychic abilities or medical intuitiveness required, just some reading about wound healing dynamics.

      SM

      #32; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:52:00 GMT
    • I hardly think I'm passive-aggressive, SM. I'd classify myself as more than willing to approach you quite directly and quite openly, despite your attempt to intimidate me by PM. :lol

      I don't own that book. Could you quote the relevant material? I have yet to locate anything that states that ALL injuries beneath the nail become anaerobic. If this is the case, why aren't tetanus boosters recommended for all lacerations beneath the nail? Why aren't they recommended every time someone smashes their finger in a door or with a hammer? After all, tetanus is ubiquitous and could be introduced under a smashed nail the next time someone starts working in their garden or cleans up the dog poop in the yard... I know the booster is recommended for crushing wounds in general, but no one has ever told us to rush to the ER for a booster if we smash our finger in the door. If what you're saying is true, do you realize how many of us are at risk for tetanus each year, due to the failure of the health authorities to warn us that we could die of tetanus due to a cut underneath the fingernail? It's downright negligent. :wink

      Does anyone have any access to any other material anywhere else, that states that all nailbed wounds are tetanus prone? I think this is certainly information of which we should all be aware. I can't seem to locate it anywhere...for some reason. I am more than capable of admitting that I am wrong, if it can actually be verified that I am wrong. If there is only one source on the entire planet that states that all nailbed injuries are tetanus prone, I'd have to wonder why it was the only source of that information, since tetanus is not exactly a new area of study.

      So I'll be more than willing to tell you that you are 100% right, all insults thrown my way aside, SM, if we can actually verify that.

      #33; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:53:00 GMT
    • Searching...

      http://www.emedicine.com/AAEM/topic319.htm

      This article says a tetanus booster is needed for nail injuries if the last one was more than 5 years ago, but in the same website's information on tetanus, there is NO mention of nail wounds being especially prone to tetanus, so I'm not going to take it that the recommendation for a booster means all nail injuries are anaerobic.

      Searching more...

      Edit: Could you quantify poor vascularity in the germinal matrix? Is there a reference somewhere that will tell me that the germinal matrix of the fingernail is ALWAYS so low in oxygen that it is susceptible to tetanus? And, btw, it is only that specific area that is low in oxygen. The rest of the nailbed has great circulation, as evidenced by its nice pink color, so there's nothing particularly concerning about an injury that occurs any random place underneath the fingernail. Low oxygen resulting from poor circulation would only be a concern in the area of the matrix. It's possible that the OP did injure (I never mentioned a scratch or scrape, btw, so not sure why you addressed that to me) the poorly oxygenated area of the matrix, but I'm still looking for any evidence that this area is ALWAYS so oxygen depleted in every human being, in every circumstance, that tetanus spores could germinate. Once I find it, I will be more than happy to tell you that you were correct. :)

      #34; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:54:00 GMT
    • One thing that struck me, about the article Science Mom posted the link to (about the 12yo boy who had the fish bone decomposing inside him for a few days) -- is the statement at the end that ALL tetanus cases, regardless of severity or the age of the person, have the possibility of complete recovery with proper treatment.

      This reality is in stark contrast to the "talk" given my college class by a first aid instructor, where she basically claimed you were doomed if you got tetanus: if you managed to survive, you'd have a lifelong case of lockjaw.

      Of course, I agree with everyone who realizes this is an awful disease -- not something we'd wish on anyone. But it's also rare. It originates in animal feces (which end up as part of dirt), and can enter our bodies if we're wounded by something with tetanus germs on it.

      Obviously it's not that easy to catch, or else why don't we hear about people contracting it after walking barefoot in the dirt (and I do that a LOT, and I often have sore, open places around my heels because of dry skin cracks: I've never gotten tetanus or any other infection).

      In the case of a wound, if the wound bleeds quite a bit at the time of injury, I don't understand why you'd need to keep it bleeding to keep tetanus from developing, regardless of whether or not the wound becomes anaerobic.

      If you bleed a lot at the time of injury, then the germs on the object that wounded you have already been pushed out of your body: at whatever point (if ever) your wound becomes anaerobic, the tetanus germs are no longer there to germinate. Just my rather unscientific (but I think accurate) take on the situation.

      Our local children's hospital seems to have a similar perspective. We took our 2yo to the ER when she cut her finger on a pocket knife 2 days ago. Dh was worried they'd pressure us about the tetanus vaccine or immunoglobulin, which I was opposed to: I didn't see any reason to expose her to that risk, when I couldn't see any risk of tetanus developing from her wound.

      She'd bled profusely after being cut, which stopped after I applied pressure, but started up again when dh got home and we took off the bandaid to check on it. We realized she probably needed stitches, and took her in. She did indeed need three stitches, but nothing was said to us about tetanus.

      When we first brought dd in, the nurse asked if we were "up to date" on her immunizations, and I simply said, "We don't immunize." Nothing more was said about it. I think this hospital may be a little more up-to-date about some knowledge, because I've heard it's usually "standard procedure" to push tetanus vaccine for any kind of wound requiring stitches.

      But then, this is the same ER where I learned, when my oldest was a baby, that fever in and of itself is nothing to be alarmed about.

      I'm just glad we weren't pressured about the vaccine, because we kind of felt like we were between a rock and a hard place. We'd heard that this hospital (and all the hospitals in our area communicate with this hospital regarding children's injuries) has a policy of contacting CPS if the same child needs emergency care more than once in a 1-year period -- and it was just last August that dd needed ER care for fracturing her elbow.

      So while dh and I knew we had the right to refuse any and all vaccines -- it was a little scary to think that our refusal of any "recommended" procedure might put our family at an even greater risk for CPS intervention. We were so relieved that it wasn't even brought up -- and the more time that passes without a call or knock on the door from a social worker, the more secure we feel that we're not going to be subject to an investigation.

      I actually once had a nurse tell me she could understand our concerns about the vaccines. It's good to know there are a few medical people who see more than one side to the issue. I actually think there are more than a few, since medical personel are somewhat less likely than the general population to follow the vaccine schedules for their own children -- it's just rare that they're so open with patients.

      #35; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 07:55:00 GMT